Gaming control board

Without LicenseSuite, you'll likely have to spend hours researching industry specific requirements and applicable governmental requirements from various agencies. The Department may by rule authorize the filing by electronic means of any application, license, permit, return, or registration required under this Act. Live events are held at various times during the year, and players can also watch them in a more air-conditioned setting thanks to simulcasting. No employee, owner, or officer of a supplier may participate in the management or operation of a charitable games event, even if the employee, owner, or officer is also a member, volunteer, or employee of the charitable games licensee. Such cafes are relatively new businesses that have sprouted, primarily in the suburbs, that cater to women, offering wine, coffee, tea and small snacks, along with the video games. The Gaming Board has broad powers to deny licenses to individuals or businesses based on criminal history, past personal or business activities and associations, or involvement in illegal gambling. Any amendments to this listing must contain an identical sworn statement.

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The Department may provide by rule for an extension of any charitable games license issued under this Act. If a licensee wishes to conduct games at a location other than the locations originally specified in the license, the licensee shall notify the Department of the proposed alternate location at least 30 days before the night on which the licensee wishes to conduct games at the alternate location.

The Department may accept an applicant's change in location with less than 30 days' notice if all other requirements of this Act are met and the Department has sufficient time and resources to process the change in a timely manner.

Licensing for the conducting of charitable games is subject to the following restrictions: The application shall contain the name of the person in charge of and primarily responsible for the conduct of the charitable games. The person so designated shall be present on the premises continuously during charitable games.

Any amendments to this listing must contain an identical sworn statement. The licensee shall likewise display, in the form and manner prescribed by the Department, the provisions of Section 9 of this Act. Such bond discretionary by the Department and shall be in an amount established by rule by the Department of Revenue.

In a county with fewer than 60, inhabitants, the Department may waive the bond requirement upon a showing by a licensee that it has sufficient funds on deposit to insure payment to the winners of such games.

Nothing in this Section shall be construed to prohibit a licensee that conducts charitable games on its own premises from also obtaining a providers' license in accordance with Section 5. The maximum number of charitable games events that may be held in any one premises is limited to 8 charitable games events per calendar year. The Department shall issue a providers' license permitting a person, firm or corporation to provide premises for the conduct of charitable games.

No person, firm or corporation may rent or otherwise provide premises without having first obtained a license. Applications for providers' licenses shall be made in writing in accordance with Department rules. Each providers' license is valid for one year from the date of issuance, or 3 years from date of issuance for a triennial license, unless extended, suspended, or revoked by Department action before that date.

Any extension of a providers' license shall not exceed one year. A provider may receive reasonable compensation for the provision of the premises. Reasonable expenses shall include only those expenses defined as reasonable by rules adopted by the Department. A provider, other than a municipality, may not provide the same premises for conducting more than 8 charitable games nights per year. A provider shall not have any interest in any suppliers' business, either direct or indirect.

A municipality may provide the same premises for conducting 16 charitable games nights during a month period. No employee, officer, or owner of a provider may participate in the management or operation of a charitable games event, even if the employee, officer, or owner is also a member, volunteer, or employee of the charitable games licensee.

A provider may not promote or solicit a charitable games event on behalf of a charitable games licensee or qualified organization. Any qualified organization licensed to conduct a charitable game need not obtain a providers' license if such games are to be conducted on the organization's premises. If a licensee conducts charitable games on its own premises, the licensee may also obtain a providers' license in accordance with Section 5 to allow the licensee to rent or otherwise provide its premises to another licensee for the conducting of an additional 4 charitable games events.

The maximum number of charitable games events that may be held at any one premises is limited to 8 charitable games events per calendar year. The Department shall issue a supplier's license permitting a person, firm, or corporation to sell, lease, lend or distribute to any organization licensed to conduct charitable games, supplies, devices, and other equipment designed for use in the playing of charitable games.

No person, firm, or corporation shall sell, lease, lend, or distribute charitable games supplies or equipment without having first obtained a license. Applications for suppliers' licenses shall be made in writing in accordance with Department rules.

Each supplier's license is valid for one year from the date of issuance, or 3 years from date of issuance for a triennial license, unless extended, suspended, or revoked by Department action before that date. Any extension of a supplier's license shall not exceed one year. No licensed supplier under this Act shall lease, lend, or distribute charitable gaming equipment, supplies, or other devices to persons not otherwise licensed to conduct charitable games under this Act. The Department may require by rule for the provision of surety bonds by suppliers.

A supplier shall keep among its books and records and make available for inspection by the Department a list of all products and equipment offered for sale or lease to any organization licensed to conduct charitable games, and all such products and equipment shall be sold or leased at the prices shown on the books and records.

A supplier shall keep all such products and equipment segregated and separate from any other products, materials or equipment that it might own, sell, or lease.

A supplier must include in its application for a license the exact location of the storage of the products, materials, or equipment. A supplier, as a condition of licensure, must consent to permitting the Department's employees to enter supplier's premises to inspect and test all equipment and devices. A supplier shall keep books and records for the furnishing of products and equipment to charitable games separate and distinct from any other business the supplier might operate.

All products and equipment supplied must be in accord with the Department's rules and regulations. A supplier shall not alter or modify any equipment or supplies, or possess any equipment or supplies so altered or modified, so as to allow the possessor or operator of the equipment to obtain a greater chance of winning a game other than as under normal rules of play of such games.

The supplier shall not require an organization to pay a percentage of the proceeds from the charitable games for the use of the products or equipment. The supplier shall file a quarterly return with the Department listing all sales or leases for such quarter and the gross proceeds from such sales or leases. A supplier shall permanently affix his name to all charitable games equipment, supplies and pull tabs.

A supplier shall not have any interest in any providers' business, either direct or indirect. If the supplier leases his equipment for use at an unlicensed charitable games or to an unlicensed sponsoring group, all equipment so leased is forfeited to the State. Organizations licensed to conduct charitable games may own their own equipment.

Such organizations must apply to the Department for an ownership permit. Such organizations shall file an annual report listing their inventory of charitable games equipment. Such organizations may lend such equipment without compensation to other licensed organizations without applying for a suppliers license.

No employee, owner, or officer of a supplier may participate in the management or operation of a charitable games event, even if the employee, owner, or officer is also a member, volunteer, or employee of the charitable games licensee. A supplier may not promote or solicit a charitable games event on behalf of a charitable games licensee or qualified organization. The following are ineligible for any license under this Act: The Department of State Police shall provide the criminal background of any person requested by the Department of Revenue.

The conducting of charitable games is subject to the following restrictions: Robert Rita, D-Blue Island, stating that he and his legislative colleagues never envisioned the creation of casino malls when they passed the Video Gaming Act. In a previous column, I noted that Rita had submitted a House resolution asking the gaming board to study the issue and suggest changes to the existing video gambling legislation to address the issue of casino malls.

Rita said one of the purposes of his resolution was to encourage the Illinois Gaming Board to deny licenses to operators in the proposed video casino mall sites. Under the video gambling act, up to five video machines can be installed at any site that is licensed. Such sites include restaurants, taverns, fraternal and veteran halls and, with increasing frequency, video cafes. Such cafes are relatively new businesses that have sprouted, primarily in the suburbs, that cater to women, offering wine, coffee, tea and small snacks, along with the video games.

Hometown Mayor Kevin Casey, who did not attend the Tuesday gaming board meeting, found it difficult to contain his outrage when told about the board's action and the gaming board chairman's comments. They're just 10 to 20 feet apart. But because they're all located on a long street, that's all right with the gaming board. I don't have a long commercial street in my town. All I've got is that strip mall and it's half vacant because Mom and Pop stores no longer exist.

We don't have the land or the foot traffic they need to justify that kind of store. People have been phoning my office asking to be placed on waiting lists for these jobs.

Many of them are single mothers. People on low or moderate incomes who need work to pay their bills. There's nothing in the state video gaming law that prevents this sort of thing and they're only opposing this because, I guess, the people in Springfield have nothing better to do. They can't come up with a budget or pay the state's pension systems, but when I try to do something for my town they have the time to stop me.

There are currently 5, video gambling locations licensed in Illinois outside of casinos and they have 21, video gambling terminals in operation, according to gaming board figures. That's the equivalent of 17 riverboat casinos. Oak Lawn has 32 licensed operators of video gambling machines and video machines.

While the mayor of Oak Lawn has said she opposes the expansion of video gambling in Hometown and her own suburb, she has complained that she has little authority to control their profusion due to the state's video gambling act. A suburb must approve video gambling, but once having done so cannot restrict the number of licenses, the number of games or their locations in the community. He told the gaming board a marketing study revealed the strip mall, directly across the street from Chicago, was best suited to attract video gambling merchants because in Chicago video gambling is illegal.

Israel contends that before he spent money on strip mall renovations he talked to a gaming board attorney and was assured there was nothing in existing law prohibiting a casino mall and then had gaming board officials visit the site to gain further assurances that everything he was doing complied with the law. While Rita opposes the casino mall concept, he admitted to me there was nothing in the existing legislation that seemed to prohibit such a development.

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